If you have a fire or water emergency, please call us now at (775) 747-2800

To have the optimal experience while using this site, you will need to update your browser. You may want to try one of the following alternatives:

Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Water and Flood Damage In Truckee

12/6/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Water and Flood Damage In Truckee All the storms this winter are going to cause a lot of flooding this Spring.

According to the Sierra Sun, "much of Northern Nevada set a record for precipitation this past water year, more than doubling the average in some areas," which means SERVPRO has been exceptionally busy with cleaning up water damaged buildings, homes, offices, and vehicles. In addition, the Mount Rose Snowline is moving uphill, meaning more liquid precipitation, and less of that precipitation falling as snow. Sad news for snowboarders, and anyone with property they'd rather keep dry. Chris Smallcomb from the National Weather Service's Reno office stated that "due to the previous record-breaking year and recent rains, the ground is saturated and flooding would occur more easily now." What you can expect from wetter conditions in a valley like Reno is snow-melt and runoff to damage foundations or soak lawns and fill up sidewalk drains. From the Truckee and Tahoe areas, you can expect that meltwater and runoff to reach your property first, and likely be the coldest. Much of it also comes in the form of rain, so you are more likely to have damage before anyone else in the valley does, since the Reno and Sparks areas have to wait for the snow and ice to melt into water before damage occurs. Smallcomb also says that a warning sign of incoming moisture is "atmospheric rivers coming off the Pacific Ocean, which can be projected five to 10 days out," so keep your eye on the news and the social media accounts of the National Weather Service. If you want to know more about atmospheric rivers, our blog has an article on what to expect from them and what they have done in the past: Atmospheric Rivers in Reno. Our social media is a great resource for up-to-date information about the valley floor, over the hill, and lake-side weather changes. For more information and to keep up with our tips, follow SERVPRO on Twitter: @SERVPRO10274 And, stay in the loop on Facebook with us, too: SERVPRO10274

Other News

View Recent Posts